Espanola Lock-Down to Take Place During the Month of September

The DWI program, through joint task force efforts, will be enforcing a multi-jurisdiction, multi-checkpoint “Espanola lock-down” to include saturation patrols in the parameters of the city of Espanola during the month of September.  “Our purpose is to collaborate in the same DWI efforts of public awareness, deterrence, perception of risk, and indicate to the public the numerous entities working together,” said Louise Sanchez, Director of the Rio Arriba County DWI Program.


The entities that will be participating in the lock-down are: Rio Arriba County Sheriff’s Department; New Mexico State Police (districts One and Seven); City of Espanola Police Department, Ohkay Owingeh Tribal Police Department; Santa Clara Tribal Police Department; Jicarilla Apache Tribal Police Department; Pojoaque Tribal Police Department; The Bureau of Indian Affairs; City of Santa Fe Police Department; Mothers Against Drunk Driving; North Central Community Based Services; Hands Across Cultures; Juvenile Probation & Parole; Rio Arriba County Detention Center; Rio Arriba County Emergency Management; Santa Fe Adult Correctional Facility and the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office. The Rio Arriba Detention Center and the Jicarilla Correctional Facility will play a key role by transporting anyone who is arrested at the checkpoints, in an effort to keep the checkpoints active by mandated officers. Saver of New Mexico will provide dissemination of information. According to Sanchez, police will be checking for insurance, seat belts, arrest warrants and alcohol and drug use.


A film crew will also be present throughout the checkpoints documenting the operation as a way to develop an avenue to educate the public about law and safety practices. Amongst the film crew are: Andres Maestas, a hired contactor; David Salazar and Sarah Maestas, both students of Northern New Mexico College; Chris Trujillo, a student of Pojoaque High school; and Paul Martinez and Adan Martinez, students of Española Valley High school.


“We are very thankful to have so many entities join us in this effort in an attempt to show the public that we will always strive to make the community safe,” said Sanchez.


-Erika L. Martinez, September 2011